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Weather and Climate in the USA

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I'm Rebecca McCullough, and today we're going to overview the US weather and climates.

So the US or United States experiences a wide range of weather conditions due to its vast size and diverse geography.

Weather patterns here are often influenced by many factors, one of the biggest being your location.

The US can be grouped into four distinct seasons for a weather and those will include spring, summer, fall, and winter with varying temperatures and precipitation levels through each of them.

So spring will occur between winter and summer and is a transitional season by warming temperatures and the rebirth of plants and trees.

Next, you'll see summer, which is the warmest season of the year, the follows spring. During this season, the days will be longer and the temperatures are higher.

Fall will come next, and is when the temperatures here begin to cool down. Finally, there is winter, which is the coldest season of the year. And temperatures begin to drop significantly.

In many regions, this is when snowfall would occur.

Each season can be grouped into their own different months shown on the PowerPoint.

One of the biggest factors of the season is and the temperatures you will experience are the regions that you are located in.

So the United States can be grouped into five different regions. Those include the Northeast, West Coast, Southeast, Southwest, and Midwest.

In the Northeast region, this will encompass states like New York, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania.

Here they experience a diverse climate. Winters are characterized by cold temperatures and often significant amounts of snowfall. And summers tend to be humid and warm.

This region will experience all four seasons.

West Coast is including states like California, Oregon, and Washington. There they have a climate heavily influenced by the Pacific Ocean. Winter here are typically cool and wet due to the oceanic influences, and summers will be dry and relatively cool.

Southeast is containing states like Florida, Georgia, and Carolina.

It is known for its humid and subtropical climate. Winters here are generally mild, though there can be the occasional cold snaps. Summer on the other hand is very hot and humid with frequent thunderstorms.

In the Southwest region, this will include states like Arizona and New Mexico.

It is characterized by a lack of rainfall and hot temperatures.

The climate is desert like often and summers are incredibly hot and dry while winters can be mild during the day, but will be cooler at typically.

Finally, the Midwest. The Midwestern region spanning through states like Illinois and Ohio, Missouri will have a mix of all weather conditions. Summers here can be humid and warm with thunderstorms being common, and winters tend to get colder, especially the further north and east within this region.

Remember that this is a very high level overview, and there are lots of complexities and details to the weather here in climate patterns across the United States. But this is your overview of our weather and our regions here.

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The Resource Center content, including all videos and other media, is for informational purposes only. You should not construe any such information or other material as legal, tax, investment, financial or other advice. The advice and information contained in the Resource Center is not a substitute for financial advice from a professional who is aware of the facts and circumstances of your individual situation